Discussion:
Do neutrinos interact with each other ...
(too old to reply)
Erdoeban Zsukloff zu Brecher Zhuang
2016-08-11 16:41:06 UTC
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... any more then they do with regular baryonic matter and energy ? Ditto
for any other candidate for dark matter - is it posited to interact with
itself, or is it supposedly as inert to itself as it is to the more orthodox
matter / energy ?

Thank you dear collective intellect !


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Daniel S. Riley
2016-08-11 17:36:15 UTC
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Eek, an actual particle physics question in sci.physics.particle!
Post by Erdoeban Zsukloff zu Brecher Zhuang
... any more then they do with regular baryonic matter and energy ?
Not that we know of. In the Standard Model, neutrinos only interact by
the weak force, and there's nothing special about neutrino-neutrino
interactions. However, it's very hard to rule out the possibility of an
additional neutrino-neutrino interaction--measuring just about anything
about a single neutrino is hard, measuring an interaction between two
neutrinos would be very hard.
Post by Erdoeban Zsukloff zu Brecher Zhuang
Ditto for any other candidate for dark matter - is it posited to
interact with itself, or is it supposedly as inert to itself as it is
to the more orthodox matter / energy ?
I don't know of any DM candidates that require a new interaction (there
probably are some I don't know about), but people have speculated about
the possibility of "dark sector" interactions--see for example Sean
Carroll on "dark photons":

http://www.preposterousuniverse.com/blog/2008/10/29/dark-photons/

Dark photons, if they exist, might be produced in electron-positron
annhhilations; if they are, they could be detectable as "missing mass"
in collider experiments.

-dan
lkcl
2017-02-07 00:37:25 UTC
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Post by Erdoeban Zsukloff zu Brecher Zhuang
... any more then they do with regular baryonic matter and energy ?
very very interesting question. from various sources i'm beginning to
understand what the neutrino is, and why it's so small. my understanding
is that it's an electron whose field has been rotated by 90 degrees so that
it is primarily in the complex numberplane (magnetic).

thus, it has FANTASTICALLY high orbital angular momentum, and virtually
nothing to stop it collapsing down to a ridiculously small radius in its
"ground state".

now, if we may accept that it *is* similar to an electron (whose field
is blah blah) then, just as with an electron there is *no reason* to
prevent its radius from being expanded out in a similar (if not identical)
analogous way to that in which electrons expand out in orbital "shells",
taking on extra energy (aka mass) in the process.

the interesting side-effect of a neutrino undergoing such "radius excitation"
would be that its angular momentum would return to much more sane levels
at the same time.

if i don't receive any "what total utter horse-s***" responses to the above,
and receive some genuine questions i will be happy to answer them and
engage with people to explore this line of reasoning further. this stuff
is fun and exciting and i'm really enjoying making progress on the theory
i'm working on. i'd be more than happy to engage with people who respect
that this stuff should be fun.

l.
b***@hotmail.com
2017-03-26 14:41:06 UTC
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Post by Erdoeban Zsukloff zu Brecher Zhuang
... any more then they do with regular baryonic matter and energy ? Ditto
for any other candidate for dark matter - is it posited to interact with
itself, or is it supposedly as inert to itself as it is to the more
orthodox matter / energy ?
Thank you dear collective intellect !
A diagram for my version of dark matter interacting with dark matter gravitationally can be seen in Figure Q here:
http://vixra.org/abs/1510.0338

In this structure, a dark matter particle is like a gluon but with zero spin. So you could get a gravitationally-connected dark matter ball on a large scale.

Figure N shows higgs particles being gravitationally attracted, which may also be candidates for dark matter.

In this model, the dark matter particles, the higgs and the gravitons all have colour-anticolour like the gluon. The graviton also has spin=2 and weak isospin; the higgs has non-zero weak isopin and the dark matter particle has (ironically) only colour-anticolour.
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