Discussion:
Do the neutrinos have mass?
(too old to reply)
Peter Percival
2019-02-10 17:35:07 UTC
Permalink
Do the neutrinos have mass, or not? Some texts say yes (but small) some
say no.
--
"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond
Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn
2019-02-10 20:50:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Percival
Do the neutrinos have mass, or not? Some texts say yes (but small) some
say no.
Note that “no mass” is a shorthand expression for “mass equals zero (units
of mass)”.

The experimentally confirmed neutrino oscillation requires neutrinos to have
a small, non-zero mass. If that is so, then the standard model of particle
physics (SM), which requires them to have mass zero, is incomplete.

For that reason and other reasons, extensions to the SM, such as SUSY
(supersymmetry), are being tested, e.g. at particle accelerators like the
Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

See also:

<https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/2015/summary/> pp.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutrino_oscillation> pp.
--
PointedEars

Twitter: @PointedEars2
Please do not cc me. / Bitte keine Kopien per E-Mail.
Peter Percival
2019-02-11 10:15:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn
Post by Peter Percival
Do the neutrinos have mass, or not? Some texts say yes (but small) some
say no.
Note that “no mass” is a shorthand expression for “mass equals zero (units
of mass)”.
The experimentally confirmed neutrino oscillation requires neutrinos to have
a small, non-zero mass. If that is so, then the standard model of particle
physics (SM), which requires them to have mass zero, is incomplete.
For that reason and other reasons, extensions to the SM, such as SUSY
(supersymmetry), are being tested, e.g. at particle accelerators like the
Large Hadron Collider (LHC).
<https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/2015/summary/> pp.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutrino_oscillation> pp.
Thank you.
--
"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond
m***@gmail.com
2019-06-23 07:43:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn
Post by Peter Percival
Do the neutrinos have mass, or not? Some texts say yes (but small) some
say no.
Note that “no mass” is a shorthand expression for “mass equals zero (units
of mass)”.
The experimentally confirmed neutrino oscillation requires neutrinos to have
a small, non-zero mass. If that is so, then the standard model of particle
physics (SM), which requires them to have mass zero, is incomplete.
For that reason and other reasons, extensions to the SM, such as SUSY
(supersymmetry), are being tested, e.g. at particle accelerators like the
Large Hadron Collider (LHC).
<https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/2015/summary/> pp.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutrino_oscillation> pp.
--
PointedEars
Please do not cc me. / Bitte keine Kopien per E-Mail.
====================
even the nutrino that once has been considered as ''no mass''
was found to have mass


NO MASS --NO REAL PHYSICS !!
moreover
mass IS THE CREATOR OF ALL FORCES !!

COPYRIGHT
Y.Porat
======================
m***@gmail.com
2019-06-23 07:39:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Percival
Do the neutrinos have mass, or not? Some texts say yes (but small) some
say no.
--
"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond
=====================
any particle has mass!!
thatis by definition of ''particle''
===

ATB
Y.Porat
==================
Tom Roberts
2019-06-24 18:42:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
any particle has mass!!
thatis by definition of ''particle''
Not really. Today we use the word "particle" as a shortcut for
"excitation of a quantum field". There is no necessity for a quantum
field to have nonzero mass, and as far as we know today the photon field
has zero mass (the upper limit on its mass is INCREDIBLY small, 1E-18 eV).

N.B. The observations of neutrino oscillations directly imply that at
least 2 of the 3 known neutrinos have nonzero mass, with an upper limit
of 2 eV. The oscillations imply mass differences much smaller than that.

Tom Roberts
m***@gmail.com
2019-06-25 23:49:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Roberts
Post by m***@gmail.com
any particle has mass!!
thatis by definition of ''particle''
Not really. Today we use the word "particle" as a shortcut for
"excitation of a quantum field". There is no necessity for a quantum
field to have nonzero mass, and as far as we know today the photon field
has zero mass (the upper limit on its mass is INCREDIBLY small, 1E-18 eV).
N.B. The observations of neutrino oscillations directly imply that at
least 2 of the 3 known neutrinos have nonzero mass, with an upper limit
of 2 eV. The oscillations imply mass differences much smaller than that.
Tom Roberts
==========================
according to my findings
ans it is well documented in sci.physics manny years ago
so the mass of the photon is about (sit sit steady on your chair(
so it is about

exp-90 KILOGRAM !!!
it is based on
E=hf !!!
====
Tia
Y.Porat
====================

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